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While demand has remained high, there is still plenty of opportunity left. Originally, only two intakes had been scheduled for 2017, but a third intake has been added to make sure producers have time plenty of chances to apply. Intake dates for 2017 are:

**Newly added intake

Intake Dates

1          February 3 – 23, 2017

2          April 4 – 18, 2017**

3          May 12 – June 1, 2017

More Information

 

Are you starting or growing a food business?dscf3272

Learn how you as a producer or small processor can access new market channels at these one day workshops. Topics include market channel opportunities, basics of food regulations, costing and pricing your products for success, food packaging and labelling, getting your product listed, and food trends: consumer and industry expectations.

For more information and to register visit: www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/busdev/facts/sellingfoodwkshop.htm

Other dates and locations planned are Renfrew, March 7, Smiths Falls, March 8, Huron county, and Middlesex county (dates TBD). Information on these workshops will be added to the OMAFRA website shortly.

farmsmart-brochure-2017-page2FarmSmart 2017 is here.

Date:  Saturday, January 21, 2017

Rozanski Hall, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON

Registration:  8:30 am, register by going to our registration site https://farmsmartconference.com/registration  or call 1-877-424-1300.

Program starts: 9:00 am – 4:30 pm

Session times and location are in the FarmSmart Bochure (pdf).

barn-fire-6Did you know?

Faulty electrical systems cause approximately 40 per cent of barn fires with a determined cause, making it one of the leading known causes of barn fires.

What can you do?

Regular inspections and maintenance are key to reducing the risk of a barn fire. We recommend that you work with a professional to inspect and monitor your farm buildings.

  • Have your buildings inspected and maintained regularly by a licensed electrical contractor.
  • Develop a preventative maintenance and housekeeping schedule.
  • Work with a professional to monitor the heat conditions of your barn using infrared technologies.
  • Work with your local fire department and insurance company to identify problem areas on your farm, and fix any problem areas identified.
  • Have a plan ready to deal with any emergency.
  • Train your family and employees on what to do if there is a barn fire. Learn how to handle and what to do with livestock, make a list of who to call during and after a fire, and establish a safe meeting point.

Visit ontario.ca/preventfarmfires to find helpful resources, including:

Barn fires can create unique challenges for farmers, including the disposal of large volumes of deadstock. The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) has a regulation that gives you options for deadstock management. These options help to protect water quality, reduce environmental impacts and minimize biosecurity hazards, such as scavenging.

Collection of deadstock by a licensed collector is recognized as the most effective and sustainable disposal method. In emergency situations, you can apply to OMAFRA for an Emergency Authorization for the storage, disposal or transportation of deadstock. These authorizations can be used when emergency conditions exist that make it difficult for you to dispose of deadstock according to the regulation.

For more information and to suggest a different fire prevention device, technology or program that could be listed on our website, contact the Agricultural Information Contact Centre (AICC) at 1-877-424-1300 or ag.info.omafra@ontario.ca.

Visit ontario.ca/farmsafety for other resources and tips for keeping your farm safe. At ontario.ca/deadstock, you can find information on contingency deadstock planning and the regulation.

ontario.ca/preventfarmfires

From OMAFRA Stakeholder Communications: Municipalities are responsible for developing their own by-laws. Your municipality may have passed by-laws that determine if you can remove a tree from your land or woodlot. These by-laws may include conditions that affect how you carry out the work, including the need for a qualified professional and/or a permit to […]

via Call Before You Cut! — onspecialtycrops

dscf3272Looking for information on agri-tourism, marketing plans, or direct farm marketing? Three updated factsheets are now available on OMAFRA’s Business Management page:

 Developing an Agri-Tourism Operation in Ontario

Are you interested in opening your farm to the public? Does your farm have the potential to integrate agri-tourism into the business? This factsheet discusses what it takes to run an agri-tourism operation, how to define your target market, and the first steps in marketing your business.

 Developing a Marketing Plan

If you are looking for information on how to develop a marketing plan or have ever wondered if a marketing plan is necessary, the newly updated Developing a Marketing Plan factsheet is a must-read.

 Direct Farm Marketing in Ontario- A Primer

Have you ever wanted to shift gears and become a price maker, not a price taker? Does direct farm marketing appeal to you? Similar to agri-tourism, there are many different considerations to take into account when entering the direct farm marketing business.

 More>>

 

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