Cooler temperatures are on the way, and it is important to review your biosecurity practices and procedures on farm.  Whether it is PED or other pathogens, ensuring strict on-farm biosecurity protocols will help you prevent infection and keep your pigs healthy.

Proper biosecurity measures should include protocols that address animal, supply and personnel movements. Take the time to review the policies and procedures with staff, highlighting the importance of biosecurity for your herd.

Set up Controlled and Restricted Access zones on your property, and make sure they are well signed to prevent non-authorized entry.

When it comes to farm access, all vehicles should be clean and free from manure. If a vehicle has been at another farm site, make sure it is washed properly before arriving. This is especially true for trucks and trailers. Ensure clothing and footwear coming on site is clean and has not been on other farms, and make use of a visitor log book to track who has been on your property and when.

At a minimum, set up and use a Danish Entry or other comparable system with a hand wash station for any personnel movement in and out of the barn. Designated boots and clothing should be available and used. Where possible, make use of a shower in/shower out system. Do not wear barn clothing or boots outside.

When bringing in supplies and equipment take appropriate precautions such as disinfection and removal from shipping boxes where appropriate. Ensure you have an effective rodent and pest control program in place, and use screens for bird control. Do not allow pets in barns as they can also be a vector for disease transfer.

Although the cold and snow are fast approaching, don’t let your biosecurity guard down. Be vigilant and keep your herd protected and healthy!


Detailed information on biosecurity practices and procedures can be found on the OMAFRA livestock website at http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/livestock/swine/health.html.

Biosecurity ‘STOP’ signs and visitor log books can be ordered by contacting the Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877-424-1300 or ag.info.omafra@ontario.ca.

For more information, contact:
Laura Eastwood, Ph.D
Swine Specialist, OMAFRA



Established in 2014, the Food Donation Tax Credit for Farmers, gives farmers a tax credit valued at 25 per cent of the fair market value of the agricultural products they donate. Community food programs, like the student nutrition program, also benefit by receiving more fresh local food for distribution to Ontario families.

This credit helps to ensure that more locally grown food ends up on people’s plates, and that includes the people who need it most in our communities.

To get the credit, you must:

  • be a resident of Ontario
  • have a farming business in Ontario
  • have donated agricultural products to an eligible community food program in Ontario.

 Eligible products include:

  • meat and meat by-products
  • eggs and dairy products
  • fish
  • fruits and vegetables
  • grains and pulses
  • herbs, honey, maple syrup and mushrooms

To receive the donation, community food programs must:

  • be registered as a charity under the Income Tax Act (Canada)
  • be able to issue receipts for the fair market value of food donated by farmers

More details on the tax credit are available by visiting: www.ontario.ca/fooddonation

If you are a farmer, reach out to your local community organizations and see how you can work together to bring more fresh, local food to people in need.



When: Wednesday, September 28th, 2016

Where: Shakespeare Community Centre, Shakespeare, ON

Registration: Ontario Pork, 655 Southgate Drive, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 5G6

Attention: Kim Coyle Fax: 519‐826‐3442 Phone: 1‐877‐424‐1300 E‐mail:ag.info.omafra@ontario.ca


The CleanFARMS pesticide collection campaign is coming to Ontario again in 2016.  This program will not be run in Ontario again until 2019, so take advantage of this opportunity.

Read below for more details.

Farmers can safely dispose of unwanted or obsolete agricultural pesticides at specific locations across Ontario. This program is free of charge to farmers. It runs from September 20-30, 2016.

 Check out the CleanFARMS website to find the location nearest you. Collection sites will only be accepting targeted products from 9 AM to 4 PM at each location. Obsolete or unwanted agricultural pesticides should be identified with a Pest Control Product number on the label.

This program offers farmers an environmentally responsible way to dispose of old or unwanted product. It is offered in each province at least once every three years. Farmers drop off their obsolete materials at a designated collection site at no charge. The products are then transported to a high temperature incineration facility where they are safely disposed of.

Since the program launched in 1998, more than 2 million kilograms of obsolete pesticides have been collected and safely disposed of.

For more information call 1-877-622-4460 ext. 2223. or visit www.cleanfarms.ca.

Originally blogged on ONfloriculture.

From Statistics Canada the Daily, August 18:

“As of July 1, there were 7,035 hog farms in Canada, up 0.1% from the same date a year earlier. These farms reported 1.2 million sows and gilts, up 0.7% from July 1, 2015.

Canada exported 2.9 million hogs in the first half of 2016, down 0.1% from the same period in 2015. There was continued strong demand for hogs in the United States. According to the most recent US data, hog inventories reached their highest June 1 level in over 50 years, up 2.0% from June 1, 2015. Hog slaughter in the US was 1% higher in the first six months of 2016 compared with the same period in 2015.

Hog slaughter increased in Canada in the first six months of 2016, up 1.3% from the same period in 2015 to 10.6 million head.

The January-to-June 2016 pig crop was 14.4 million head, up 2.2% from the same period in 2015.”

On Sept. 6th and 7th, 2016 OMAFRA, along with Ontario Pork and Swine Innovation Porc, will host a Group Sow Housing Seminar. Two different seminars will present group sow housing options with practical solutions to the challenges of different systems, along with potential opportunities associated with group housing. Both days will feature a discussion panel and exhibitor space.

Day 1 – Sept 6th, 4 pm until 8:30 pm
The day 1 evening program is designed for producers who already have group housing systems in place. We will provide ample opportunities for discussions amongst producers, and will focus not only on how to handle some of the challenges producers encounter, but on the potential opportunities that are available to producers within these systems.

Day 2 – Sept 7th, 9 am until 5:30 pm
The day 2 program is designed for producers who are looking at group sow housing options. This full day program will provide practical information from a wide variety of speakers. Should you renovate or build new? What will you do with your sows during a renovation? What are producers doing across Canada? How can you capture added potential through Nutrition? What technologies are coming down the line?

The registration brochure with full program can be found below or by visiting http://www.groupsowhousing.com/producer-events/

Pre-registration is required by Aug 26th, 2016. 

To Pre-register, contact:
Carrie Parsons
For more information, please contact:
Laura Eastwood, OMAFRA Swine Specialist

2016 Group Sow Housing Seminar Brochure – Electronic Final

Brochure Image


Farmers experiencing dry weather challenges can find feed, production and management information at OMAFRA. Visit ontario.ca/agweatherissues or contact the Agricultural Information Contact Centre at 1-877-424-1300 or ag.info.omafra@ontario.ca

via If you’re still looking for rain… — ONvegetables