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Archive for June, 2012

Every farm should have a response plan to deal with extremely hot weather.  The Humidex plan is a simplified way of protecting workers from heat stress which is based on the 2007 ACGIH Heat Stress TLV® (Threshold Limit Value®) which uses wet bulb globe temperatures (WBGT) to estimate heat strain. These WBGT’s were translated into Humidex.   Suggested guidelines can be found at  http://www.ohcow.on.ca/menuweb/hhrplan.pdf

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Vitamin Dis an essential nutritional component of swine diets. It regulates calcium and phosphorus absorption and metabolism, and appears to regulate other metabolic processes in animal cells. A recent pilot project on four swine farms in Ontario looked at the variation of vitamin Din swine diets.  Find out more   

  

 

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The 2012 Ontario Pork Congress got off to a great start today in Stratford, Ontario. The Gold Event lunchtime speaker was Dr. Ross Kiehne from Swine Vet Centre in Minnesota. If you didn’t make it today, Pork Congress continues tomorrow from 10 to 5 pm. Check it out at http://www.porkcongress.on.ca

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Hear what you missed about PRRS Transmission Myths and Realities – Dr. Paul Yeske, DVM, Swine Vet Centre, Minnesota
Complete Presentation (8.6 MB), Questions (1.6 MB)

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Tuesday June 19 & Wednesday June 20, OMAFRA Booth A4-A5 in Agriplex Building, Stratford Rotary Complex, Stratford, ON
Further information available at: www.porkcongress.on.ca

June 19 & 20: Tradeshow; The Gold Event “Lunch & Learn; Pig Art;
June 19:  The Hog Jog; June 20: Junior Barrow Competition

Come and see what ventilation and feeder space is required for raising heavier hogs, plus other production information at the OMAFRA booth from 10 am to 5 pm.



 


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The May Swine Budgets are now available on the OMAFRA website.

2012 May Swine Budget

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Rodents can be a big problem on swine farms.  Each rat on a farm will eat, spoil or damage approximately $25 worth of grain per year. Rats and mice have a tremendous breeding potential. Under ideal situations, a pair of rats and their offspring can produce 20,000,000 young in 3 years. Mice reproduce even faster. One female mouse can give birth to 5-10 litters per year, yielding five to six young per litter. The gestation period is a mere 19-21 days. These babies are sexually mature in 6-10 weeks. The average female mouse lives to be 9 months. One female rat is capable of producing another 22 breeding females in 1 year (assuming a 50:50 male/female ratio of offspring), which mature in 3 months after parturition. Find out more about control and management in the OMAFRA Factsheet Rodent Control in Livestock and Poultry Facilities.

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