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Posts Tagged ‘transport’

Ontario has seen very few new reports on the PED front in the last months; however, given the virulence of the virus and its increased persistence in cold weather, additional cases might be expected as winter approaches.  Proper biosecurity remains the best tool to prevent the spread of this virus.  Pork producers and industry stakeholders must continue to be diligent in order to limit the impact of PED in Ontario. It’s critical that everyone follow strict biosecurity procedures at all times. These include the following:

  • Ensure all incoming pigs are from a PED negative farm.
  • Follow and enforce proper entry protocols. Dedicated barn boots and coveralls must be available for all staff and visitors. Use a Danish Entry System that allows for unidirectional flow of staff and visitors entering the barn. A hand wash or hand sanitizer should be available upon entry.
  • If using deadstock pickup, ensure carcasses are picked up off-site. Wash and disinfect equipment used to transfer carcasses from barn to deadstock bin.
  • Ensure transporters are following your farm’s protocol for trailer sanitation. A washed and disinfected trailer will reduce the risk of disease transmission to your farm. Refer to ‘Cold Weather Trailer Disinfection Procedures’ available from OPIC. Communicate biosecurity protocols to any service providers visiting your farm.
  • Refer to the National Swine Farm-level Biosecurity Standard and discuss your biosecurity plan with your veterinarian.
  • Monitor your herd for clinical signs of the disease, particularly vomiting and diarrhea. Call your veterinarian immediately with any concerns. They will advise you on what to do next.

Information on PED, including links to biosecurity protocols, and other best practices related to deadstock and manure handling, etc., are available at www.Ontario.ca/swine. You can also subscribe to this blog and follow @ONswineinfo on Twitter for updates and links to resources.

This virus is very persistent and easily travels with snow and slush. It will require a dedicated effort to keep this one under control, and off your farm, over the coming winter.

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We may not be quite experiencing a heat wave yet, but there is sure to be hot weather coming. Anyone caring for livestock needs to be prepared for high temperatures.

OMAFRA has produced a free Heat Stress in Livestock and Poultry app for smartphones that can help determine when livestock are at risk of heat stress on the spot, either in the barn or at time of transport.

By entering the current temperature and relative humidity on your smartphone you can estimate heat stress risks quickly and easily. The app also suggests steps to take to reduce heat stress to maintain feed intake and productivity.

appCheck it out here.

The app is useful in assessing a whether a crisis is imminent, but routine maintenance can help avoid risk too. This would be a good time to clean fans, check that louvers and inlets are moving freely, and clean up the sensors and controllers. Ventilation systems need to be working at maximum efficiency and need to be tuned properly to maintain temperature and humidity at acceptable levels. A ventilation system failure can be catastrophic. Even alarm systems can fail so constant vigilance is required when things get hot.

When it it does get really hot outside, ventilation alone can’t provide adequate cooling. When pigs are too hot, they don’t eat. Pigs that don’t eat don’t grow. This is most apparent in heavier pigs nearing market, when the upper preferred temperature of the pig is only around 21C.

There are a few things that can be done to help keep pigs from overheating. Pigs need to lose heat either by contact with a cold surface, or through evaporation of water from their body surface. Since they don’t sweat, that moisture must come from somewhere else. Water sprinklers or drip systems are effective ways of providing relief from heat stress. 1-2 minutes of sprinkling every 20-30 minutes is all that is needed. Time it so that the water is nearly all evaporated before reaching the floor, and so that the ventilation system has time to clear the humidity before the next application.

Adequate drinking water is absolutely critical. Make sure there are enough drinkers for your animals. Go get wet and cool off yourself by thoroughly inspecting every drinker in your barn.

If you can’t make use of the Heat Stress app, this table can be used instead. The intersection of current temperature and humidity indicates the level of stress pigs may be facing, and the level of response that needs to be taken to reduce it (see below for some more options).

 

Signs of heat stress
• Evident discomfort/distress, pigs lying apart, body stretched out
• Manure patterns change, pen floors become wet/dirty, pigs all dirty
• Increased water consumption (up to 6x normal)
• Noticeable decrease in pen activity, slowness and lethargy
• Muscle trembling
• Rapid fall in feed consumption/reduced weight gains, pigs seem to stall out
• Very high respiration rate (panting)

Pigs will try to increase heat dissipation and decrease body heat production. Producers can aid this by making sure that:

• Pigs have unrestricted access to a good supply of clean water
• Timed water sprinkler/mister system triggered by room temperature
• Proper ventilation for the size of room/weight of pig/time of year
• Enough pen space for size of pigs, do not overcrowd (all the pigs can lie down without touching each other and still access feeders/waterers/dunging area without stepping on pen mates)
• Diets can be reformulated in the summer to be more nutrient dense, while ensuring
nutrient needs (amount/day) are still being met.

Transport during any season is also an area the can cause heat stress in pigs and may result in death loss. When possible try to:
• Load animals in groups less than five
• Adjust transport to early morning or at night (summer)
• Load fewer pigs per load on hot, humid days
• Provide wet shavings when temperature is over 15C, do not use straw
• When temperature is over 27C, sprinkle pigs with a course spray of water prior to loading
• Do not pour large amounts over cold water over on an overheated pig as the shock may kill it
• Load and unload promptly to avoid heat buildup
• Death loss due to heat stress is most often attributed to power outages in hog barns when there is no alternate power source or power loss back-up plan. Test your alternate power generation and power outage alarms monthly for fan operated barns
(static pressure barns). Check panic doors/drop curtain releases for natural ventilated barns. Heat build-up non-ventilated barns can cause fatalities in all seasons.

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There is a new national program that everyone in the pork industry needs to know about (see PigTrace Canada for full details).

Effective July 1st of this year federal regulations will make pig traceability mandatory in Canada. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has developed regulations under Canada’s Health of Animals Act that will require both the sender and receiver to report the movement of pigs within seven days of shipment or reception.  A document containing the movement information must accompany all pig shipments and records must be retained for 5 years.  These regulations have been in process for several years and were developed through extensive consultation with industry representatives, including Ontario Pork and the Canadian Pork Council.

Administration of the database is being conducted by PigTrace Canada, which is an industry led pig traceability program. The goals of the system are to ensure protection, prosperity, and peace of mind for the Canadian pork industry and its customers.  The program is designed to improve the response to animal health or food safety emergencies, which will minimize the impact of market disruptions and will also support market access.

Having valid premises registration numbers for each location (for example farms assembly yards, or abattoirs) that ships or receives pigs is a requirement of the PigTrace Canada system.  There are certain features of the program that simplify movement reporting in certain circumstances, but it is the responsibility of both the sender and receiver of animals to ensure that all pig movement is recorded and reported.

Watch for the information packages that Ontario Pork will be mailing to producers later this month.

If you’re not aware of the requirements of these new regulations, which come into effect on July 1st, be sure to visit the Ontario Pork booth at the Ontario Pork Congress in Stratford, June 18 and 19.  You can also check out the June issue of Pork News and Views to learn more. Complete information on the PigTrace Program is available on Ontario Pork’s website (www.ontariopork.on.ca) or at www.pigtrace.ca

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An Advisory from OMAF/MRA:

Industry Advisory

Animal Health and Welfare Branch

Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food and Ministry of Rural Affairs


Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus

To date, the rate of PEDv infection continues to decline.  Currently, similar proportions of infections are being reported in finisher and farrow to finish/nursery operations. These infections may be the result of PEDv contaminated vehicles entering the premises, breaches in on-farm biosecurity and previously-infected younger animals moving through the production system. While it is suspected that PEDv initially entered Ontario in feed ingredients, the virus continues to circulate and remains an ongoing risk to the Ontario pork industry. The cooperation of all levels of industry and government has been essential in minimising the impacts of PED to the Ontario pork industry.   Vigilance and strong biosecurity at the farm level, diligent cleaning and disinfection by transporters, renderers, processors and other service providers will be imperative to reduce the viral load and prevent further dissemination of PEDv within Ontario and neighbouring provinces.

OMAF-funded research will soon begin at the Ontario Veterinary College to learn more from the PED outbreak experience.

PED has become established in the United States, and other pathogens like Delta coronavirus present new threats.  The efforts made to prevent the spread of PED must continue as regular business practices as the industry manages these risks and moves forward. Growing Forward 2 and OMAF funding to Ontario Pork will continue to strengthen efforts in the areas of greatest risk and provide the necessary infrastructure and education to help meet these challenges.  Federal officials continue to work with the USDA to reduce the risk of contaminated feed stuffs entering Canada.

PED is considered an emerging significant disease in Ontario, and veterinarians are still required to report suspect cases to OMAF under the Animal Health Act. OMAF will continue to cover the cost of diagnostic testing of clinical suspects at the Animal Health Laboratory until further notice, and will continue to offer support to veterinarians and their clients in the management of PED cases.  Testing of non-clinical or environmental samples will not be covered by OMAF.  Producers are encouraged to work with their veterinarian to prevent PEDv infections or to contain or eliminate the virus from infected farms.

For further information please contact the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food at 1-877-424-1300, or Ontario Pork at 1-877-ONT-PORK.
Resources on PED prevention and management are available from OMAF at www.ontario.ca/swine.

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 A notice from Ontario Pork:

Deadstock Disposal Reminder

Despite best efforts, mortalities are inevitable and must be dealt with to safeguard everyone’s well-being. The alternative poses risks to environmental quality, animal health, and public health. Improper disposal of deadstock is also a sensitive public relations issue.

This winter has been difficult for disposal and pick up.  We ask that producers ensure dead stock is picked up in a timely manner.  There are several workable deadstock disposal options that can be put in place on the farm, even in cold weather.

Information is available outlining the four recommended on-farm deadstock disposal approaches: composting, use of a disposal vessel, burial and incineration. These approaches are approved under the deadstock regulation and are designed to minimize environmental risk.

www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/environment/facts/peddisposal.htm

Regulations under the Nutrient Management Act state:
1. The dead farm animal must be monitored at least daily until it is collected.
2. The dead farm animal must be stored in a manner that:
i. prevents liquids that leak from the animal from escaping onto the ground,
ii. protects it from scavengers, rodents, insects and other pests, and
iii. conceals it from public view

For PED updates and resources: www.ontario.ca/swine

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A new infosheet “PED Virus and Considerations for Manure Application”  is now available. The best way to address the spread of the PEDv and other pathogens is through preventive action and thorough biosecurity.  Anyone spreading manure has a role to play in reducing the risks of transmitting the virus.  For more information go to ontario.ca/swine

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A release from the London Swine Conference yesterday www.londonswineconference.ca.

Note the Registration deadline is March 14th. Contact 519-873-4077 or debra.allison@ontario.ca

For Immediate Release…

  “14th London Swine Conference (LSC) moves to Hilton”

 London ON, March 4, 2014 – The theme is “Positioning for Success” as the pork industry prepares to gather in London for the fourteenth annual LSC.  These two full days of presentations and workshops have moved to the Hilton London for Wednesday and Thursday, March 26 & 27, 2014.  Speakers will cover topics ranging from practical on-farm decision making and management to the impacts of international trade on pork production.

 “I am excited about the timely topics with something for everyone” says conference Chair Teresa Van Raay.  The program will once again be targeted for sow herds on Wednesday, and wean to finish on Thursday.  “With speakers from across the continent and a new venue I am looking forward to seeing everyone at this premier swine industry conference.”

Wednesday’s Sow-focused agenda will include ‘Lessons Learned from PEDv’, along with experts in the areas of group sow housing, nutrition and lactation, and Ontario’s position in the global marketplace.  At the farm level, workshops will consider piglet and milk management, reproductive troubleshooting, feeding the sow, and practical aspects of  group sow housing.

On Thursday, the focus is on Wean to Finish.  Topics such as real factors that affect profitability, the importance of international trade to Ontario production, and national health status monitoring will be covered.  Farm level workshops will include managing pile-ups, benchmarking and measuring profitability on-farm, spotting problems early, higher fiber diets, and improving feed efficiency.

As always, the LSC program will include leading researchers, industry experts and pork producers.  This unique mix of perspectives provides new insights and can lead to lively workshop discussions.  Presenters this year will include:  Steve Pollmann, Murphy Brown West; Doug MacDougald, South West Ontario Veterinary Services; Chris Byra, Canadian Swine Health Intelligence Network; Ron Bates, Michigan State University; Laurie Connor, University of Manitoba; Chantal Farmer, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; Ruurd Zijlstra, University of Alberta; Kevin Grier, George Morris Centre; Graeme McDermid, Cronin Pork Ltd.; Kathleen Sullivan, Trade Consultant.

For a listing of all conference speakers and the full program visit:  www.londonswineconference.ca

Conference fees are $135 per day which includes one copy of the proceedings, a reception on Wednesday, lunch and all coffee breaks.  Discounts are available for groups of five or more who register and submit one payment.  Registration deadline is March 14, 2014.  Please note that there is no registration at the door.

The London Swine Conference is a joint effort by staff from Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food and Ministry of Rural Affairs (OMAF and MRA), Ontario Pork, University of Guelph, Ontario Pork Industry Council, and is made possible through strong industry sponsorship.

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 For more information:

Debra Allison, Registration Coordinator, OMAF and MRA, (519) 873-4077, Debra.Allison@ontario.ca, www.londonswineconference.ca

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